Archives for the month of: August, 2014

9780804136631
ISBN 978-0-8041-3663-1

Thanks to Blogging for Books, I just finished, A Spy Among Friends – Kim Philby and the Great Betrayal.

Certainly a good read, one which incredulity spikes about every other page. Kim Philby was known as one of the greatest spies in the 20th Century. Ben Macintyre has written a suspenseful novel, and he has based tremendous psychological insight into personal papers and never-before-seen intelligence files.

I normally am not a reader of spies or World War II. Anyone who wants an intricate view of the range of events and plans and depth of intrigue occurring during World War II will not be disappointed.

It is a prodigious book, clear to follow, except for this reader who at times was boggled by the duplicity of so many spies, and who trusted whom. Basically, Kim Philby was a product of good schooling, elite circles, exclusive clubs. Sprinkle long night of drink and carousing and the cavorting wiles of spies, albeit, against or for, whatever country, and the book becomes a page turner.

Kim Philby was unknown to anyone close to him and duplicitous to all. Many were fooled by his being a double spy for England and the USSSR.

This reader lived in Russia, really Ukraine and Belarus for a 3 year period with some trips back to the states. We were there really with the concept of peace and promotion of a different concept of the oneness of humanity. We were ordinary citizens meeting the rank and file in the society, a society encased in shame. The people were grief stricken that they had been so deluded. Communist changed into business suits, the mafia kept on keeping on, and yet the society opened up.

The intricacies of the spy trade command a horrific attention. So much intrigue; so much mathematical callousness as far as ordinary people were concerned. Philby caused 100s to die, but he remained very British, very club oriented, very alcoholic. None of his wives really knew him. They thought they did. His children adored him. How would they know? He does come across in this view as a father who cared, but what a price he pays.

I ended my horrified reading wondering was it total power, just being ahead of the game, any game, and why not two competing powerful nations. How could he be so deluded by Communism, and Stalin? The egos and delusions of spy networks and the crumbling times we all live in.

At any rate, it was a compelling read, but shocking. My questions remain. Was Philby a sociopath? What compelled him? Such blind allegiance. What really motivated him?

As an aside, I’ve been watching Manhattan on PBS and the same power hungry intrigues are revealed as the story of the atom bomb unfolds. Obsession, ego and power – oh dear.

Once again, thanks Blogging for Books! great way to spread the word about good reads!

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If I were younger, I’d visit Georgia; as it is I subscribe to an enchanting blog: Bassa’s Blog. I don’t visit it enough, but I found the Georgia About blog through Bassa. The modern architecture in Georgia is fascinating.

Georgia About

The introduction of Public Service Halls throughout Georgia is one of many important reforms that are improving the lives of its citizens.

Public Service Hall in Mestia

What are Public Service Halls?

Tagged ‘Everything in One Space’, Public Service Halls are essentially one-stop-shops delivering key services, such as public access to public records, issuing of passports and IDs and business registration.

Because services are housed in one building there is no longer a need to visit different governmental offices.

This can save a huge amount of time and cost.

Each Public Service Hall houses the functions of:

Civil Registry Agency

National Agency of Public Registry

National Archives of Georgia

National Bureau of Enforcement

Notary Chamber of Georgia.

The first Public Service Hall in Georgia was opened at the end of May 2011 in Batumi. Since then, further Public Service Halls have opened in Kutaisi, Rustavi, Mestia, Ozurgeti and Gurjaani. A construction program…

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Somehow I feel very connected to this blogger; she’s just put out an interesting piece!

35andupcynicismonhold

Last February 25 was the 28th anniversary of the EDSA Revolution, also known as People Power I, in Philippine history.  It happened from February 22 to 25, 1986. People gathered in the Epifanio De los Santos Avenue(EDSA) to topple the rule of then President, Ferdinand Marcos, dubbed a despot. The rest of the so-called civilized world hailed the event as a triumph of democracy, a glorious punch on totalitarianism. I was still in high school in the province, that time… Most Filipino bloggers have been born after that historic event, coincidentally. They have little or no idea what it was like to live under the Martial Law: an iron hand, so to speak…

image of EDSA I Revolution, in 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution unseated a dictator and enabled free press, once again… / filamfunk.blogspot.com

My first serious blog talks about life 30 plus years ago, life as it was lived in a barrio –…

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